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Event Detail

startupspace

26
Mar

10:00 AM - 02:00 PM - US / Mountain

Online Unemployment Workshops

By Utah Valley BRC

event details

The Department of Workforce services has launched online workshops for laid off workers Unemployment Workshops: www.jobs.utah.gov/covid19 These are 30 to 45-minute seminars that will give information on how to apply for unemployment benefits, what temporary financial assistance may be available and tips for finding a new job. They will be available every day during the workweek from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. through April 10th



additional information

Fired vs. Laid Off vs. Resignation: Knowing the difference can impact you eligibility for unemployment: Before signing any paperwork, first determine the nature of your termination and how the company is characterizing your separation from the company. Layoff: Is not considered to be the fault of the employee. It usually has nothing to do with the employee's personal performance. A layoff is often called a "reduction in force" or "down-sizing" and usually more than one employee loses their job. In some cases a layoff may be temporary and the employee is rehired when the economy improves. In most cases a layoff qualifies a worker for unemployment benefits. Fired: An employee can be fired for a variety of reasons. The most common for being terminated for cause is unsatisfactory performance on the job. Work can also be fired fo misconduct, not complying with company standards, or taking too much time off, damaging company property, embarrassing the organization publicly, or otherwise failing to adhere to the terms of their employment contract. Termination under such circumstances most often disqualifies individuals for unemployment benefits. Employees can only get unemployment benefits if they can prove the termination was wrongful or against labor laws. In many cases employees need to prove their case during a claims investigation or appeals process. Resigning: Typically you're not eligible for unemployment benefits if you resign. If the resignation is forced and the company doesn't dispute that, you'll likely be able to collect benefits. Ask your employer to agree not to fight your application for unemployment. Get that in writing. Read Article Here: https://www.thebalancecareers.com/difference-between-getting-fired-and-getting-laid-off-2060743



special instructions

The Department of Workforce services has launched online workshops for laid off workers Unemployment Workshops: www.jobs.utah.gov/covid19 These are 30 to 45-minute seminars that will give information on how to apply for unemployment benefits, what temporary financial assistance may be available and tips for finding a new job. They will be available every day during the workweek from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. through April 10th. _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Fired vs. Laid Off vs. Resignation: Knowing the difference can impact you eligibility for unemployment: Before signing any paperwork, first determine the nature of your termination and how the company is characterizing your separation from the company. Layoff: Is not considered to be the fault of the employee. It usually has nothing to do with the employee's personal performance. A layoff is often called a "reduction in force" or "down-sizing" and usually more than one employee loses their job. In some cases a layoff may be temporary and the employee is rehired when the economy improves. In most cases a layoff qualifies a worker for unemployment benefits. Fired: An employee can be fired for a variety of reasons. The most common for being terminated for cause is unsatisfactory performance on the job. Work can also be fired fo misconduct, not complying with company standards, or taking too much time off, damaging company property, embarrassing the organization publicly, or otherwise failing to adhere to the terms of their employment contract. Termination under such circumstances most often disqualifies individuals for unemployment benefits. Employees can only get unemployment benefits if they can prove the termination was wrongful or against labor laws. In many cases employees need to prove their case during a claims investigation or appeals process. Resigning: Typically you're not eligible for unemployment benefits if you resign. If the resignation is forced and the company doesn't dispute that, you'll likely be able to collect benefits. Ask your employer to agree not to fight your application for unemployment. Get that in writing. Read Article Here: https://www.thebalancecareers.com/difference-between-getting-fired-and-getting-laid-off-2060743



Date and Time

Thu., March 26th, 2020

10:00 AM - 02:00 PM - US / Mountain



Location

Online Event



Conference Call URL

Access Here



Interests

Community Support
COVID-19



Industries

Nonprofits